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OSHA

Standards

Deadline Extended to Comment on OSHA Improving Provisions in Standards

Comment by Jan. 4, 2017

Published: Monday, December 12, 2016 - 13:07

(OSHA: Washington, DC) -- The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is extending the comment period for its proposal to revise provisions in the agency’s recordkeeping, general industry, maritime, and construction standards. Originally scheduled to expire Dec. 5, 2016, the comment period will be extended to Jan. 4, 2017, to allow parties more time to review the rule and collect necessary information and data for comments.

The agency is revising provisions in its standards that may be confusing, outdated, or unnecessary.

Individuals may submit comments electronically via the federal e-rulemaking portal at www.regulations.gov. Comments also may be submitted by facsimile or mail. The deadline for comments is Jan. 4, 2017.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education, and assistance. For more information visit www.osha.gov.

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OSHA

In 1970, Congress created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education, and assistance. OSHA is part of the U.S. Department of Labor. OSHA's administrator answers to the Secretary of Labor, who is a member of the cabinet of the President of the United States. The OSH Act covers most private sector employers and their workers, in addition to some public sector employers and workers in the 50 states and certain territories and jurisdictions under federal authority.