NIST’s picture

By: NIST

To any of his sports-fan colleagues, NIST mathematician and computer programmer Vernon Dantzler might have been somewhat of a celebrity. Dantzler had been a professional baseball player, and a star shortstop in the Texas circuit of the Negro Baseball League during the early 1940s, before the desegregation of Major League baseball. Dantzler also had a degree in mathematics from the Tuskegee Institute, and would later earn a graduate degree in the same field from American University.

Ryan E. Day @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day @ Quality Digest

Sponsored Content

In a TED Talk, Geordie Rose, co-creator of the D-WAVE quantum computer, said, “Humans use tools to do things. If you give humans a new kind of tool, they can do things they couldn’t otherwise do—imagine the possibilities.”

Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Dirk Dusharme @ Quality Digest

In case you missed it, last week’s Quality Digest Live contained some great articles and discussion between myself and my co-host, Quality Digest publisher in chief Mike Richman. In the show, we covered:

Manufacturing Trends to Watch in 2017

In this run-down of technologies to watch, of particular interest to us was the concept behind Amazon Go.

Robin Materese’s picture

By: Robin Materese

A catchphrase from a popular reality show goes: “One day you’re in. And the next day, you’re out.” For the purposes of the show, the host is referencing fashion. But the same could be said about science. With each new discovery or advance, an old theory or idea often becomes obsolete—or at least less important.

Ryan E. Day @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day @ Quality Digest

Everything, it seems, has a vulnerability. For werewolves, it’s silver bullets. For Superman, it’s Kryptonite. For manufacturing—it’s rework. Rework means loss of throughput, which means loss of profit, which can mean death by a thousand rewelds. But, just as silver bullets can be dodged, and Kryptonite can be avoided, much rework can be prevented by adopting appropriate technology.

Jessica Gabel Cino’s picture

By: Jessica Gabel Cino

Forensic science has become a mainstay of many a TV drama, and it’s just as important in real-life criminal trials. Drawing on biology, chemistry, genetics, medicine, and psychology, forensic evidence helps answer questions in the legal system. Often, forensics provides the “smoking gun” that links a perpetrator to the crime and ultimately puts the bad guy in jail.

Matthew Pasek’s picture

By: Matthew Pasek

Joe Schlecht’s picture

By: Joe Schlecht

NIST’s picture

By: NIST

Throwing a perfect strike in virtual bowling doesn’t require your gaming system to precisely track the position and orientation of your swinging arm. But if you’re operating a robotic forklift around a factory, manipulating a mechanical arm on an assembly line, or guiding a remote-controlled laser scalpel inside a patient, the ability to pinpoint exactly where it is in 3D space is critical.

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