Statistics Article

Stanford News Service’s picture

By: Stanford News Service

Most leadership advice is based on anecdotal observation and basic common sense. Stanford Graduate School of Business professor Kathryn Shaw tried a different tack: data-driven analysis.

Joby George’s picture

By: Joby George

Having difficulty managing quality and quality-related data? You’re not alone. Many manufacturers struggle with this these issues due to paper-based or other disparate systems being used to track, manage, and report on quality events. Walk about a production room floor, and there’s a good chance you’ll see a few three-ring binders or folders stuffed with handwritten, quality-related worksheets and forms.

Eston Martz’s picture

By: Eston Martz

If you were among the 300 people who attended the first-ever Minitab Insights conference last month, you already know how powerful it was. Attendees learned how practitioners from a wide range of industries use data analysis to address a variety of problems, find solutions, and improve business practices. For those who weren’t there, here are five helpful, challenging, and thought-provoking ideas and suggestions that we heard during the event.

Scott A. Hindle’s picture

By: Scott A. Hindle

In all walks of life, being wrong can come with a penalty. It’s also true that, if you’re lucky, you sometimes get away with it without anybody being the wiser. To understand what this means in relation to the capability indexes Cp and Cpk, read on.

Scott A. Hindle’s picture

By: Scott A. Hindle

Part two of this four-part series on process capability concluded with Alan just about to meet Sarah for a second time. He thought he was making good progress with his analysis of Product 874 data until he was asked to assess process capability, even though it can’t be assessed for an unstable process.

Scott A. Hindle’s picture

By: Scott A. Hindle

In part one of this four-part series, we considered the basics of process capability, as witnessed through the learning curve of Alan in his quest to determine the product characteristics of the powder, Product 874. We pick up with Alan here as he prepares for his second meeting with his colleague Sarah, to discuss his preliminary results.

Scott A. Hindle’s picture

By: Scott A. Hindle

In my August 2015 article, “Process Capability: How Many Data?” I discussed whether 30 data were the “right” number in an analysis of process capability. In this four-part series, the focus is on understanding what process capability is and the pitfalls associated with it, along with how it can help manufacturers develop process knowledge, reach better decisions, and take better actions.

Barbara A. Cleary’s picture

By: Barbara A. Cleary

Approaching the end of the school year means focusing on graduation rates, dropout rates, and other data suggesting trends for students. Opportunities for considering statistics abound, but one must examine the way that these statistics are actually used by asking the right questions about the data.

Ken Levine’s picture

By: Ken Levine

How do you determine the “worst case” scenario for a process? Is it by assuming the worst case for each process task or step? No. The reason is that the probability of every step having its worst case at the same time is practically zero. What we’re looking for is a value that will occur a very small percentage of the time, but still be a possibility.

Ken Voytek’s picture

By: Ken Voytek

In a recent post, I examined the differences in productivity across small and large manufacturing firms, and noted that there were differences across manufacturers in terms of size. But it’s also clear from the literature that productivity differs across companies even in the same industry.

Syndicate content