ASQ’s picture

By: ASQ

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When flood waters ravaged portions of Colorado in September 2013—killing crops, inundating homes, and buckling many miles of roadways—countless federal, state, and municipal government workers sprang into action helping citizens. State and federal government agencies spent millions in the weeks and months following the natural disaster to help residents of the Rocky Mountain state.

Cole Cooper’s picture

By: Cole Cooper

A production part approval process (PPAP) is used by companies to establish confidence and rules in a production process. In a sense, it gives customers a view into their suppliers’ manufacturing capabilities.

Joel Bradbury’s picture

By: Joel Bradbury

Healthcare professionals have a long history of caring for their patients and improving the quality of their services. During the Crimean War (1853–1856), British nurse Florence Nightingale realized that the mortality rate of soldiers was far too high. A visionary statistician as well as a talented nurse, she spent months analyzing data to identify what caused the high rate of mortality. She found that hygiene and sanitization were neglected in the triage and care of the soldiers.

Michael Causey’s picture

By: Michael Causey

Ryan E. Day @ Quality Digest’s picture

By: Ryan E. Day @ Quality Digest

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Paula Oddy’s picture

By: Paula Oddy

Changes to the global economy during the last two decades have dramatically altered the landscape of business and industry. Globalization has enabled an ever-lengthening supply chain, which confers greater complexity and risk to every step of the process, whether for material goods or for services. Manufacturers are long familiar with this equation, but companies in the service and transactional sectors must now be mindful of the increased risk that comes from outsourcing and offshoring.

Brooke Pierce’s picture

By: Brooke Pierce

When Congress passed the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), “risk” moved front and center as a feature of provider reimbursement models. These days, terms such as “at risk” and “risk-based” are used more and more, but what do they really mean? And why should healthcare providers now be more concerned with risk than they have been in years past?

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