Jeffrey Phillips’s picture

By: Jeffrey Phillips

I love innovation. I love all facets of it: the discovery of needs, creativity, unique solutions, and the realization of ideas as new products and services. But what concerns me sometimes is the way in which we attempt to implement innovation, because we are likely to constrain it at the time we need it most.

Kara Baskin’s picture

By: Kara Baskin

Care.com co-founder Donna Levin played a key part in that company’s growth, and the passion was personal. Levin’s work plans were curtailed when her son was 11 weeks old and had a seizure following a difficult pregnancy. Tests were inconclusive. Her daycare situation evaporated; she and her husband took turns staying home with the baby for three years until his health stabilized. Her husband worked nights, she worked days, and somehow they muddled through.

Dan Jacob’s picture

By: Dan Jacob

Disruption is a funny thing. You see it coming—kind of—but it’s hard to tell what it means. Back in the day, would you have foreseen the shift from taxis to Uber? Would you have predicted that HVAC units would be offered as a service rather than purchased as a product? These disruptive changes and many more were driven through use of the cloud, connectivity, machine learning, and mobile apps as important technologies that enabled digital transformation and the industrial internet of things (IIoT).

Multiple Authors
By: Siddharth Dhomkar, Jacob Henshaw

With the amount of data storage required for our daily lives growing, and available technology becoming saturated, we’re in desparate need of a new method of data storage.

Craig Schlenoff’s picture

By: Craig Schlenoff

Whether they’re behind the scenes assembling products or helping you parallel-park your car, robots are already playing a big role in our day-to-day lives, and their presence will only become more pervasive in the coming decades. But they aren’t good at everything—yet. For instance, robots in manufacturing don’t “think on the fly” very well.

In a word, their movements can be a little mechanical.

By: Dianne Hillhouse

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Manufacturers often hold suppliers to a rigid quality process that dictates tight controls on all raw materials. Nonconforming material can potentially halt the production line, wasting time and money. Unfortunately, material mix-ups are a reality in critical manufacturing operations.

Mika Javanainen’s picture

By: Mika Javanainen

Are your back office systems talking to your front office systems? Back office systems manage manufacturing functions as well as administrative functions such as quality management, accounts payable, and contract management. Examples of front office systems include customer relationship management (CRM) and help desk systems.

American Customer Satisfaction Index ACSI’s picture

By: American Customer Satisfaction Index ACSI

(ACSI: Colorado Springs, CO) -- Customer satisfaction with banks is up, according to the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI). Its recent report covers the finance and insurance sector, which includes retail banks, credit unions, health insurance, property and casualty insurance, life insurance, and internet investment services.

AssurX’s picture

By: AssurX

Life sciences companies around the world should make sure their corrective and preventive action (CAPA) plans are in good shape before a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) inspector comes calling. Looking at a deep pool of letters issued this year domestically and internationally, it’s clear the agency will focus like a laser on CAPA.

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